All work and no play makes Jack and dull boy.

Tag: film (Page 1 of 10)

creating, connecting, composing

Special event for film makers, digital artists and composers

Showroom Cinema 5, Sheffield.
Ever wanted to write music for film? Ever wanted brand new music for your film? This is the event for you. At Showroom 5 you will have the opportunity to share your work and talk to film makers and composers, exchange ideas and make contacts that lead to creative outputs.
13:30 Registration
14:00 Free drink and biscuits
14:30 Guest speakers (Heather Fenoughty: http://www.heather-fenoughty.com/)
15:00 Open Communication
16:00 Screenings and listenings
16:40 Coffee
Important links:
South Yorkshire Filmmakers Network (syfn.org)
For more details see http://www.shef.ac.uk/usss
Register free by emailing rob@syfn.org 
Call the SYFN on 0114 276 2400 or Adrian Moore on 0114 222 0486 for more information. 

And we're off!

Goodbye Ruby Tuesday

After months of working on ideas for this feature film I’ve finally found the time this week to set things in motion. We’re looking for an experienced producer for our film, someone who can bring the right degree of fund raising capability, contacts and management skills to our low budget indie feature.
“Goodbye Ruby Tuesday” is the story of a young boy’s struggle with life, loss and his search for hope and acceptance. I’ve been talking to two actresses about this script for some time now. Mhairi Calvey, who played Ruth in my own short film “Land of Dreams” and who has just finished work on Pete Goddard’s feature “Any Minute Now”, has been lined up in the title role for some time and has been a great asset in developing her character. She’s become a really good friend too and we’re both enthusiastic to work together on this this summer. We’ll be doing the SlamDunk Cinema Show on January 28th to begin promotion of this film too.
Another actress I’ve been speaking to is Sarah Allen. Currently a student at UCLAN studying drama I got talking to Sarah at the end of last summer. She showed an immense enthusiasm for the story and has demonstrate a capability and commitment that has won her a key role in the film.
I’m hoping to audition for the lead role of 16 year old  Kasper in the next few weeks, as well as prepare some video diaries and stuff to promote the fund raising and general publicity for the film. With any luck I should have a producer by then who can take that stuff off my hands!

Death and All His Friends

Blimey, what a year 2011 was. We lost Tracey’s dad to cancer in April. We lost Grandad Fred’s companion Joan in August. We lost my Aunt Wil in September (cancer again) and Tracey’s Uncle Ian in November.
I was looking forwards to the New Year when word got to me via the social network that an old friend of mine, Trevor Hinchcliffe, had also joined the ranks of those who left us in 2011. Although I’ve not seen Trevor since I was at school myself – some 20 years ago, near enough – I do have some very distinctive memories of growing up together, mostly from our time in the same class at Bramley Sunnyside Junior School. In fact, I’m just remembering a photograph I have somewhere, probably at my parents house now, of Trev when we went to Habershon House at Filey in the junior school. We were 11 years old and the picture shows Trev and Steve Denton holding a dead fsh they found on the beach at Scarborough. Things you do as kids! Will have to see if that picture is still around somewhere.
He was a good lad, and I hear he was a good man too. Rest in peace, old friend.
In fact, rest in peace all of those whole left us last year.

Some Riot

Back in the dim and distant past I had the opportunity to do a little bit of mentoring with an A-level student from Wickersley Sixth Form called Joshua Glenn. He stood out as a really capable and talented student, moreso in film about which he was incredibly passionate. He’d already taken to making mini-trailers and movies for his school and in 2010 he created short film called “Some Riot” about a man trapped in limbo between life and death who had to accept his fate and go with Death into the underworld.
Not a cheery topic to be sure, but his initial film showed a good degree of talent. It had Bergman-esque themes and style and although it was technically lacking it had a vast amount of potential. I suggested at the time that he remake the film for Eye Films but it wasn’t until the late Spring of this year that we actually set the wheels in motion.
We both spent a lot of time thinking about the subtler meanings, sign and symbols in the film – the representation of the Underworld as a lake of water for example, or a butterfly as the spirit and soul of the dying man. Joshua did quite a bit of reading and research into ancient myths to help him refine and develop his ideas further, add a bit of polish to them as it were. I suggested various things that lended themselves to strong visuals- Death standing on the water, for example – and he took these ideas with aplomb.
The resulting film is visually gorgeous. Stunning cinematography by Vish Vishvanath and fabulous sound design and score by Dave Walker (yet again he pulls out all the stops and delivers 100%+) along with a perfect performance by Liam Rooke has created a film that I’m proud to be associated with.
“Some Riot” is a somewhat arty and experimental film. It’s what I’d regard as “pure film” – communicating meaning and ideas in purely visual terms – and on that level, as on many, I think it is spot on. It won’t be everyone’s cup of tea because it’s not a linear storytelling narrative as most people are used to, but I feel really passionately that there is a place for it and I’m in really pleased with the end result. Hope you like it too.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02E0dudB3_o&hd=1]

Autumn wanderings.

Some Riot

Finished shooting Joshua Glenn’s short film “Some Riot” two weeks ago now and the first cut of this is down. It needs some work – some pick-ups and refinement but it’s coming along nicely. We’re hoping to have it finished by the end of September but in the meantime have a look at the promo poster I’ve just done for the film. Joshua is rather please with it, as am I.

It’s just a case of thinking about a strategy for festivals once the film is completed. Which leads me to…

A Sense of Disappointment

Really disappointed that Georgia’s Angel was turned down for both Encounters at Bristol and Raindance this last week; and Land of Dreams was similarly turned down for Encounters.
In fact, a little bit annoyed to be quite honest.
But reflecting on this I came to the conclusion that, really, despite all of the planning for both films, what was never taken into consideration was a promotional plan. It has just been the case that I’ve submitted the films to whichever festivals popped up in the sidebar on WithOutABox. And here is the lesson, one I often repeat at the start of the film-making cycle and one I have now officially been burned by at the end.
PLAN.
Then PLAN A BIT MORE.
Then PLAN A LITTLE BIT MORE THAN THAT.
I have failed to make sure these films were targeted at the right places. Take Georgia’s Angel, for example. Our test audience feedback from the UK was largely successful. However, the Canadian audience were a bit more challenging, in large part because of the nature of the film and – believe it or not – the accents of the cast.
Yes, you read that correctly.
Of course, this is not something I should’ve ignored. The film appeals more to a local (i.e. UK) audience an maybe it should’ve been submitted to small festivals there first to build up a head of steam.
But what is the problem with Land of Dreams? Feedback has been universally positive for that. I think the issue here has been the lack of planning and preparation. The WOAB profile is not particularly detailed and there is nothing in the way of a plan of direction for the film at festivals.
So… that’s this week job then!

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